Street Harassment

This happened earlier this week and I talked about it on Facebook:

Walking to the Metro today I said good morning in a businesslike way to a man. I greet people because I am telling them, I am aware of you. The man looked me up and down in a way that was not about respect, and said, “I’d like to get to know you better.” I put on my best I-am-alpha-and-you-will- go-away-now voice, usually reserved for barky dogs on long runs, and said, “That is inappropriate.” “Can I get your phone number?” he called as I strode past him. I dialed up the hostility and replied, “That is VERY inappropriate,” and kept walking. 

Street harassment continues to be a real thing, y’all. If it feels safe, call that shit out (whether the target is you or someone else) and then spread the word. Pretending it’s not real and hoping it will go away is clearly not working.


Misplaced Nostalgia

Does anyone else hear a live recording in a bar in Washington DC of Pearl Jam performing Small Town and get homesick? No? Just me?

"This is for people from small towns… like Poulsbo…"


dierwolf:

2014 was one of those years that started out like “THIS IS GOING TO BE GREAT!!!” and its halfway through and we have a war going on, a deadly disease has been spread, countless shootings have happened, racism is alive, more people have been leaving living things inside of hot cars, and robin williams is fucking dead

This pretty much sums it up.

(via backcountryranger)


lucyknisley:

“My cemetery is in Key Biscane. It’s one of the prettiest in the world. Lovely trees, the sky is blue, the birds… The one in Los Copa is really shit. What a pain in the ass you are. It’s true- you’re not young and you’re not new and you do make people laugh. And me? I’m still with you because you make me laugh. So you know what I’ve got to do? I’ve got to sell my plot in Key Biscane so I can get one next to you in that shithole, Los Copa, so I never miss a laugh.”

lucyknisley:

My cemetery is in Key Biscane. It’s one of the prettiest in the world. Lovely trees, the sky is blue, the birds… The one in Los Copa is really shit. What a pain in the ass you are. It’s true- you’re not young and you’re not new and you do make people laugh. And me? I’m still with you because you make me laugh. So you know what I’ve got to do? I’ve got to sell my plot in Key Biscane so I can get one next to you in that shithole, Los Copa, so I never miss a laugh.”


Also a map home for wayfaring park rangers whose hearts yearn for jagged mountains, Douglas fir, Northwest Coast Art, the Puget Sound’s clean tang, pretentious coffee, and the rumbling open fifth announcing your ferry is leaving now.
subpop:

Originally created as a map home for wayfaring #SubPop employees w/ poor senses of direction, we decided that this graphic would make an excellent t-shirt. Get yours at the following internet destination: u.subpop.com/subpop_USA (at SubPop.com)

Also a map home for wayfaring park rangers whose hearts yearn for jagged mountains, Douglas fir, Northwest Coast Art, the Puget Sound’s clean tang, pretentious coffee, and the rumbling open fifth announcing your ferry is leaving now.

subpop:

Originally created as a map home for wayfaring #SubPop employees w/ poor senses of direction, we decided that this graphic would make an excellent t-shirt. Get yours at the following internet destination: u.subpop.com/subpop_USA (at SubPop.com)


Big Trauma

I have been thinking about how being a ranger is all about the here-and-now. We have a couple of supervisors who either just retired, or are retiring soon. One of the permanent rangers observed, “I’ve seen a few people retire. Some are ready, and some fight it tooth and nail. Some try to establish a legacy and think nobody will be able to replace them. But you know what? The day after their retirement, it’s as if they were never here. We’re all replaceable.”

This is true. It is a paradox of being a park ranger. We are critical to the well-being of both visitors and park. We are well-trained, with hundreds of hours of preparation for medical emergencies, search and rescue, law enforcement emergencies, wildlife management, boat operation, swiftwater rescue, high angle rescue…the list goes on. It takes a lot of time and money and experience to make a ranger, and yet when one retires or quits or dies or is fired, the hole is easily plugged. There’s always another ranger, someone who’s put themselves through law enforcement academy or EMT class or language training, someone’s who’s logged hundreds of hours of their own time on the crag or in the mountains or in the water, ready and eager to step in.

Which leads to the existential question: why are we here?

Lots of things happened at work this week. I was interviewed by kids for our Junior Ranger program. A woman gave hugs to me and all the people who put her husband on a backboard and carried him down a rocky trail to a waiting ambulance, and refused to be deterred when we protested that we were sweaty and dirty and she really didn’t need to, we were just doing our jobs. I explained soil compaction and the reason for exclosures to people who’d jumped the ropes into a revegetated area—and was backed up by a guide who said when he started working in that area 20 years ago, trees that are thriving now appeared dead. I was the first on scene and medical lead for a serious climbing accident; it was my first “big trauma” and, fortunately, it was a win—the patient has a lot of recovery in front of him, but will probably be able to climb again one day. I cannot emphasize strongly enough that I did not save the young man’s life, but that I was part of a group of 40 or so who probably did.

These are small things and won’t matter much in the large view, but in the moment they do. It has taken me a long time to learn to be right here, right now. I’m not very good at it still, but more and more I see how vital it is. As a ranger, the meaningfulness of my work isn’t what my legacy will be decades hence—because it probably won’t. It lies in what is happening now. Two days ago 40 people saved a life and it does not matter to me that we can and will all be replaced one day. It matters to me that we were there on that day.


Q
Do you have any advice for people in outdoor recreation/ education during the winter season? I'm not sure where to look for a job to cover that last quarter of the year.
A

Working over the holidays at REI has stood me in good stead for two winters. Outfitters appreciate staff who know, use, and love the stuff being sold—and who can convey passion and expertise to customers without being condescending. I think rangers and educators are great in this role because we already have the experience with taking a second position and putting ourselves in our customers’ (sometimes confused and overwhelmed) boots. We can answer questions without coming across as gearheads, members of The Nature’s Label-Wearing Elite.

I know lots of people who’ve worked at ski resorts. Apparently it’s pretty easy to get work as a ski instructor, even if your own experience is limited—but be prepared to teach lots of tiny kids and have an erratic schedule the first winter. However, a season pass is part of the perks! There are also jobs as lifties, customer service reps, housekeepers, servers, etc.

I’m applying for winter seasonal jobs with NPS. Right now there are openings for protection rangers, interpretive rangers, fee collectors, and more. Hiring is more competitive in the winter but they can’t say “no” if you don’t apply.

Barring that, I hear there’s a very nice REI near Ryan’s new digs…


Junior Rangers are the best thing ever. This one’s excitement actually abated by the time I got my camera out; you should’ve seen when she started taking her pledge.

Junior Rangers are the best thing ever. This one’s excitement actually abated by the time I got my camera out; you should’ve seen when she started taking her pledge.


This is beautiful and sad and awesome.

This is beautiful and sad and awesome.

(via backcountryranger)


If it is right, it happens — The main thing is not to hurry. Nothing good gets away.

John Steinbeck on falling in love (via ckgarden)

☺️😌

(via backpacksandmountaintops)

(via adventureproof)